ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 
When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.
But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)
At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  
Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”
Amen to that, Hugh. 
Watch the full talk and performance here »
ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 
When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.
But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)
At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  
Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”
Amen to that, Hugh. 
Watch the full talk and performance here »
ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 
When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.
But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)
At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  
Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”
Amen to that, Hugh. 
Watch the full talk and performance here »

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »


Quite possibly the best/worst fortune cookie fortune ever.

Quite possibly the best/worst fortune cookie fortune ever.

teaonatrain:

vmites:

….tea rexes. Hahaha? Get it? Tea. Ha. I’m going to sleep.

aaaaaaaa

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.
gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II
Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.

gommidy:

Tire Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji - Parte II

Korean artist’s Yong Ho Ji art is all about recycling tires . He uses tire strips and synthetic resins to create these unique sculptures. His collection gathers sculptures and busts of usual animals and also hybrid animals and humans.

burnsides:

Composing helps me think -Ethan Yazel

awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)

awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour.

biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.

photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensenlouise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)

staceythinx:

Photos of the very unusual mantis shrimp by Roy Caldwell from Wired’s Absurd Creature of the Week feature. Check it out for plenty of fun facts about this “honey badger of the sea”.
staceythinx:

Photos of the very unusual mantis shrimp by Roy Caldwell from Wired’s Absurd Creature of the Week feature. Check it out for plenty of fun facts about this “honey badger of the sea”.
staceythinx:

Photos of the very unusual mantis shrimp by Roy Caldwell from Wired’s Absurd Creature of the Week feature. Check it out for plenty of fun facts about this “honey badger of the sea”.
staceythinx:

Photos of the very unusual mantis shrimp by Roy Caldwell from Wired’s Absurd Creature of the Week feature. Check it out for plenty of fun facts about this “honey badger of the sea”.

staceythinx:

Photos of the very unusual mantis shrimp by Roy Caldwell from Wired’s Absurd Creature of the Week feature. Check it out for plenty of fun facts about this “honey badger of the sea”.